SSA1192: DISNEY WONDER outbound from Astoria OR on Sept. 11, 2018.

SSA1192 DISNEY WONDER Leaving Astoria at Sunset

This image of Disney Cruise Line’s DISNEY WONDER is outbound from Astoria, Oregon on Sept. 11, 2018.
 
It is nostalgic & a bit haunting for me because she sails by the exact location of where the old Great Northern Pacific Steamship Co. was located in Flavel, Oregon from 1914-1917. That company operated two ships that were the largest passenger ships on the Pacific at that time. They were similar in style (with modern differences) and paint color (black hulls, white superstructure & red stacks.
 
The DISNEY WONDER is a rare exception in the modern day of cruise ships. Disney built their ships in the classic style of ships of the early 1900’s with modernized design and as such are really the best examples of cruise ships reflecting the style of the ocean liners of the 1910-20’s.
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SSA1183: DISNEY WONDER cruise ship leaving Astoria, OR – Sept. 2018.

 

SSA1183  DISNEY WONDER Bow-on view

Disney Cruise Line’s DISNEY WONDER is shown in this unique bow-on view leaving the Port of Astoria, Oregon on September 11, 2018.

The 964 foot long vessel has a beam of 106 feet & drafts 25 feet. She was built in 1999 by Fincantieri Marghera shipyard in Italy and made her maiden voyage on August 15, 1999, a four day cruise around the Bahamas. The ship has a capacity of 2400 passengers & 945 crew.

The vessel has a diesel-electric propulsion system that produces a 21.5 knot cruising speed & a maximum speed of 23.5 knots.

Currently, DISNEY WONDER makes seasonal cruises on the West Coast & Alaska during the summer season & Caribbean & Bahamas cruises during the winters.

SSA1182: Disney Cruise Line’s DISNEY WONDER at Astoria OR – Sept. 11, 2018.

SSA1182  DISNEY WONDER at Astoria OR Sep 11 2018

Shown here is the Disney Cruise Line’s DISNEY WONDER at Pier One in Astoria, Oregon on Sept. 11, 2018.

The 964 foot long vessel has a beam of 106 feet & drafts 25 feet. She was built in 1999 by Fincantieri Marghera shipyard in Italy and made her maiden voyage on August 15, 1999, a four day cruise around the Bahamas. The ship has a capacity of 2400 passengers & 945 crew.

The vessel has a diesel-electric propulsion system that produces a 21.5 knot cruising speed & a maximum speed of 23.5 knots.

Currently, DISNEY WONDER makes seasonal cruises on the West Coast & Alaska during the summer season & Caribbean & Bahamas cruises during the winters.

SS039: Wreck of the Freighter JA CHANSLOR at Cape Blanco, OR – 1919

SS039 Wreck of Steamer JA CHANSLOR at Cape Blanco, OR 1919

Between the two pillar rocks in the center of the photo rests the bow of the 4938-ton Associated Oil Company tanker JA CHANSLOR after the ship was violently driven onto the rocks at Cape Blanco, Oregon on December 18, 1919.

The JA CHANSLOR was built in 1910 by Newport News Shipbuilding Company in Newport News, Virginia. She was 378 ft long with a breadth of 52 feet and drafted 29 feet.

On her final voyage she was making her way up the coastline from San Francisco & other California ports with a cargo of 30,000 barrels of bulk oil. She was swept off-course when she became enveloped in a thick fog & hit with exceptionally strong swells & currents. The ship was driven with such force on a rock ledge near the Cape Blanco Lighthouse that she immediately cracked & buckled amidships.

The mid & aft sections of the vessel quickly broke up & sank trapping & drowning 26 crewmen in those sections but the bow stayed on the ledge with the remaining 13 crewmen. They managed to lower a lifeboat but two of the men died of exposure while the boat drifted north over the next day & a half after the wreck. Seven more crewmen drowned when they attempted to land the lifeboat near present-day Bandon, OR.

Of the 39 crew, only 3 survived the wreck, the Captain & two seamen. The bow section later drifted ashore near the Sixes River.

The wreck of the CHANSLOR resulted in demands & changes in coastwise vessel’s routes, moving them further offshore to allow for compass deviations in fog & currents.

SSA1051: Great Lakes Bulk Freighter ARTHUR M. ANDERSON – July 1963

SSA1051 Freighter ARTHUR M ANDERSON July 1963

This is the Great Lakes bulk freighter ARTHUR M. ANDERSON, as built, leaving the Eisenhower Lock at Massena, New York on July 15, 1963.

The ship was built by the American Shipbuilding Company in Lorain, Ohio in 1952. She was 647 feet long with a 70 foot beam drafting 36 feet. It was built for the Pittsburgh Steamship Division of US Steel.

Power was supplied by a 7,700 s.h.p. cross-compound steam turbine engine (steam expanded through 2 turbines) built by Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Pittsburgh, PA with 2 heavy fuel oil fired Foster-Wheeler water tube boilers providing the steam; the power then transmitted to the single controllable pitch propeller through double reductions gears driving the ship at a speed of 14 knots.

While the ship has continued to be in service, it has undergone several refits. One in 1975 was the addition of a new 120 foot midsection, increasing her overall length to 767 feet & in 1981, she received a new self-unloading boom on her aft section.

The Arthur M. Anderson’s most notable claim to fame and perhaps the reason her name will become engraved in the annuls of Great Lakes maritime history is for the roll she played to the Edmund Fitzgerald disaster in the early evening of Monday, November 10, 1975.

On a sunny November 9, 1975, the Anderson had departed Two Harbors, MN into Lake Superior with a load of ore for Gary, IN. Shortly after departure, she was overtaken by the Edmund Fitzgerald having left Superior two hours earlier with a load of taconite ore for Zug Island on the Detroit River. The two captains (Capt. Jesse B. Cooper of the Arthur M. Anderson and Capt. Ernest M. McSorley of the Edmund Fitzgerald) agreed to run together maintaining radio and radar contact with each other on their Lake Superior transit through a forecasted storm. On their last leg of their run following the eastern Canadian shore of Lake Superior toward Whitefish Bay, they were exposed to extremely heavy following seas of 20 to 30 feet. The Anderson lost sight of the lights of the Fitzgerald in a squall and then the Fitzgerald disappeared from the Anderson’s radar screen. Emerging from the squall, the lights of the Fitzgerald were also gone. Repeated radio calls to the Edmund Fitzgerald were unanswered and no ships either in or leaving Whitefish Bay into Lake Superior reported seeing the Fitzgerald come off the lake. The Arthur M. Anderson reported the missing commercial vessel Edmund Fitzgerald to the U.S. Coast Guard. After conducting an initial futile search of the area for survivors, the Anderson entered into the protection of Whitefish Bay from the stormy Lake Superior in the early hours of November 11.

In March 2001, US Steel ceased all transportation operations & the ANDERSON became a ship operating for a new fleet, USS Great Lakes Fleet, a subsidiary of Great Lakes Transportation and repainted in their livery.

Currently, the ship is in long-term lay-up at Duluth MN.

SS940: Cargo Loading on the SS DENALI at Ketchikan, AK – March 1951.

SS940 Loading Cargo on SS DENALI in 1951

A cargo box is being loaded aboard the aft section of the steamship DENALI of the Alaska Steamship Company at Ketchikan, Alaska in March 1951.  Note the auto already loaded on deck.

The DENALI was the second ship of the line to bear that name, the first having been wrecked in 1935. This ship was built in 1927 as the CARACAS for the Atlantic & Caribbean S.N. Company and sold to Alaska Steamship in 1938.

The DENALI has the distinction of being the final ship to carry passengers in the steamship era on the West Coast. She made her final voyage in this capacity departing Seattle, Washington at 3PM on September 24, 1954. She was sold out of the line later in the year and subsequently renamed CUBA & later SOUTHERN CROSS.

She was ultimately scrapped in 1960.

SS939: Alaska Steamship Co. Passenger Ship DENALI at Ketchikan AK – 1951

SS939 SS DENALI at Ketchikan, Alaska March 1951

This restoration is the steamship DENALI of the Alaska Steamship Company docked at Ketchikan, Alaska in March 1951.

The DENALI was the second ship of the line to bear that name, the first having been wrecked in 1935. This ship was built in 1927 as the CARACAS for the Atlantic & Caribbean S.N. Company and sold to Alaska Steamship in 1938.

The DENALI has the distinction of being the final ship to carry passengers in the steamship era on the West Coast. She made her final voyage in this capacity departing Seattle, Washington at 3PM on September 24, 1954. She was sold out of the line later in the year and subsequently renamed CUBA & later SOUTHERN CROSS.  She was ultimately scrapped in 1960.

LH001 Permaquid Point Lighthouse in Bristol, Maine – 1980

 

LH001 Permaquid Point Lighthouse, Maine 1980

This is Permaquid Point Lighthouse at Bristol, Maine as seen in July, 1980. The stone-built lighthouse was built in 1835 and converted to an automatic light in 1934. The keeper’s house was originally built in 1857.

The tower is 38 feet tall, the focal plane is 79 feet.  It has a fourth-order fresnel light that flashes a white light every six seconds.  The light has a 14 mile range.

The grounds and keeper’s house are owned and managed by the Town of Bristol and there is a Fisherman’s Museum now located in the keeper’s house. The keeper’s house, oil house & fog bell tower are still standing.

The lighthouse was added to National Register of Historic Places on April 16, 1985.